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Gatorade – First developed by Florida University researchers looking to combine water, carbohydrates and electrolytes to keep athletes hydrated, Gatorade has become so much more. From the now famous, almost necessary “baths” of coaches after big wins to the sponsorships of big-time athletes, Gatorade is a sports essential.
Who hasn’t wanted to chug some lemon lime (Fruit punch? Frost-Glacier Freeze?) after sweating it out at the gym or the court?

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2012 – Super Bowl XXXVIII was set to be another exciting, pigskin-filled event between the Panthers and Patriots. But fans got more than they bargained for when Justin Timberlake ripped off singing partner Janet Jackson’s attire with fury.

The fallout was enormous. Events were to be shown on a time delay after that, and until 2012 the Super Bowl halftime shows were filled with old rock stars. Really anyone least likely to pull the same stunt. It was all anyone could talk about after the game.

 

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2007 – After it was discovered that Bill Belichick and his once-respected crew videotaped the Jets’ defensive signals during the September 9th game, pigskin nation as a whole was a bit concerned that this was a more serious problem.
Never before had a team, in the midst of building a dynasty, been caught cheating in such a public way.

 

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2006 – A national hero for France, one of the all-time greats, all you have to do is Google “Zinedine Zidane” to see how huge of a blunder this was. First thing that pops up, “headbutt.” And rightfully so, it happened on the biggest sporting stage on the planet: The World Cup Finals. Allegedly stemming from an insult of his sister, Italy’s Marco Materazzi was hit in the chest by the midfielder, was red-carded. Italy won 5-3 in a shootout.

 

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1997 – The rematch added fuel to a heated rivalry on June 28, 1997, but few could believe their eyes, watching the most vicious heavyweight bite his opponent’s flesh and spit it out. It was so bizarre. Mike Tyson was already seen as a lunatic, but this sealed the deal with absolute certainty. And people watched: 1.99 million households bought the pay-per-view, a record at the time.

 

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!996 – we knew Atlanta was going to have something very cool planned for whoever would light the Olympic torch, but we were still blown away by what we saw. Muhammad Ali, ravaged by Parkinsons, shakily lit the torch as we watch in awe and inspiration. It was a brave performance by one of our greatest athletic heroes and a moment that will stick in our minds forever.

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1993 – At the ESPYs, a cancer-stricken Jim Valvano gave one of the most inspirational speeches the world has ever heard. He reminded us: “don’t give up, don’t ever give up.” Valvano died eight weeks later, but his lasting image was one of hope.

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1990s – And to think what would have happened if he didn’t retire at age 26 … Still, even in his relatively short professional career (1973-1983, plus an unsuccessful comeback in the early 90s), Borg took home 11 Grand Slam Singles titles, a mark that was unmatched until Federer came along.
He’s considered one of the best, if not the best, to ever pick up a racket. Yet, there will always be a huge “what-if” lingering over his career, because who knows how many more Grand Slams could be on his mantle if he didn’t walk away.

 

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1989 – It was Game 3 of the World Series… The San Francisco Giants were taking on the crosstown Oakland A’s. The Bay Area World Series. But it wasn’t the game that made headlines. It was the earthquake that hit during the game.                                             The largest earthquake ever to be caught on national television. It stalled the World Series for 10 days while a city tried to put itself back together. One good thing about the quake happening during the game is that officials say it may have saved lives because people left work early to watch

 

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1983 – Sailing isn’t exactly a sport that comes up when talking with buddies at the bar, but it’s hard to argue with the significance of the streak which was broken here — considering it was the longest in the history of sports.
From 1857 to 1983, the America’s Cup yacht race was won annually by the New York Yacht Club. But in ’83, Australia II finally put that to an end. Kind of hard to be a sore loser after winning for 125 years.

 

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1972 – After a full-scale drug testing program was instituted, most expected substance abuse to drop off. Szymon Kolecki, Mabel Fonseca and of course Marion Jones headline a large throng of unnatural stars who were caught. With each positive test and tarnished legacy, the cloud of suspicion widens, not only in track, but in all sports.

 

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1971 – Really, for the non-historically inclined: Ping Pong Diplomacy.
A game Americans usually think of as frat-house fare helped ease tensions between the US and China after the countries welcomed in the other’s players, eventually paving the way for President Nixon to travel to China for face-to-face meetings with the China’s leaders. Before the US team stepped foot into Beijing 1971, no American sports delegation had done so since 1949.

 

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1970 – A plane carrying 37 player and eight members of the coaching staff of the Marshall football team crashed during a November trip. It was something that could have devastated a program completely,  but Marshall fought back and persevered with new coach Jack Lengyel, winning two games that year— most notably an emotional 15-13 game against Xavier in the home opener. It was a lesson in overcoming all obstacles and carrying on for generations to come.

 

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1959 – Joe Louis was a bad man. He was also an honest, blue-collar hero during the post-Jack Dempsey era and an immortal boxing icon, but a bad man nonetheless.
He successfully defended his title 25 times before retiring in 1959. That is the definition of protecting what is yours.

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1920 – Two players have died in the history of Major League Baseball while playing, though August 16, 1920 is the most infamous, as a ball became lethal.
Mays, playing for the Yankees at the time, hit Chapman (of the Indians) in the head, who would pass away from his injuries. It led to the rule that umpires must replace the baseball when it became dirty, though batting helmets wouldn’t become standard until three decades later.

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